The history of MBCT


Mindfulness meditation teaches you to recognise memories and damaging thoughts as they arise. It reminds you that they are memories. They are like propaganda, they are not real. They are not you. You can learn to observe negative thoughts as they arise, let them stay a while and then simply watch them evaporate before your eyes. And when this occurs, an extraordinary thing can happen: a profound sense of happiness and peace fills the void.

Mark Williams


Closely based on MBSR, Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) was developed by Segal, Williams and Teasdale as an intervention designed to prevent recurrences of major depression.
It integrates the main elements of MBSR with some cognitive therapy components. Although originally designed to prevent depression relapse, applications of MBCT to other problems and disorders are being explored and the research literature shows promising results.

   it was secular enough to appeal to a wide range of people from all sorts of walks of life;
  it was grounded in science;

  it was intensive enough to make a difference; and

  it was short enough to be "do-able" in a community setting.

The scientific paradigm emphasises objectivity, cost-effectiveness of health outcomes and a quest for evidence-based practice – and has been crucial for mindfulness to be able to have found it’s strong and impactful place in the world. The teachings from Buddhist practice bring their profound experiential understanding of the mind and body - providing a useful map for how to investigate the relationship between our 'inner' and 'outer' lives in order to really understand how to reduce suffering for ourselves and others.

Over the years Jon Kabat-Zinn's original program has now been translated into a range of mindfulness applications for specific issues including: substance addiction, pain, depression, anxiety, eating problems, cancer and for specific contexts such as leadership, workplaces, education, the criminal justice system and for frontline workers such as medical staff, child-protection workers, police personnel and firefighters.

People came to those original mindfulness trainings with Jon with all their stress, hope, curiosity, skepticism, busyness, pain, physical illness, demanding jobs, anxiety, depression, relationship troubles, general disenchantment and unease, and genius - to do an experiment in living with more presence and care over eight weeks and beyond. 

We invite you to come and do that same experiment and see what it can offer you.


What People Are Saying

I gained a lot from this course! I would definitely recommend it to friends and already have. I hadn’t been feeling ‘myself’ at the start of the course, and hadn’t been for almost a year. I had long term RSI which has gotten better in the 8 weeks – not 100% yet, but better than 6-8 months of physio beforehand! I feel myself again, and friends and work colleagues have noticed I seem happier, less stressed and I feel able to cope with stresses easier.

Tracey, 2017

Inner strength, confidence through knowing myself better, a more positive view of my future knowing that all I need is to turn into my pain and remember it will pass

Anna, 2016

It has definitely changed relationships in my life. Also it has helped me deal with confrontation a lot better. It has helped me become a lot more task focussed and given me the skill to see where my mind often wanders and why it goes to certain places. Loved the course and would recommend it to everyone.

Lacee, 2015

The course has made me feel a lot calmer in a busy life. It has reminded me to stop and smell the roses. It has taught me that awareness – is just that – not complicated! That meditation is not about stopping all thoughts but acknowledging them and letting them pass and then focussing back on the here and now.

Lisa 2016

It is hard to verbalise the surprisingly profound impact this experience (so much more than a course) has had on me. It has been so complete—spiritually, emotionally, professionally and intellectually.

Patrick 2016